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10 km Flight

Starship SN9

SpaceX

Launch Status
Partial Failure

Mission

10 km Flight

Type: Test Flight

The SN9 Starship performed a first flight similar to the one of SN8. It launched up to an altitude of 10 km or 33,000 ft, did a belly flop maneuver and a controlled descent to the landing pad where the landing flip maneuver was unsuccessful and resulted in the destruction of the prototype on impact.

Location

Launch Pad B

SpaceX Space Launch Facility, TX, USA

9 rockets have launched from SpaceX Space Launch Facility, TX, USA.

Launch Pad B, SpaceX Space Launch Facility, TX, USA

Rocket

Starship Prototype – SpaceX

Family: Starship
Length: 50 m
Diameter: 9 m
Launch Mass: 45 T

The Starship Prototype was manufactured by SpaceX with the first launch on 2019-07-26. Starship Prototype has 6 successful launches and 3 failed launches with a total of 9 launches. Prototype of SpaceX’s Starship, a fully reusable second stage and space vehicle.

Core Landing

SN9 was destroyed on landing.

SpaceX Starship Landing Pad – LZ

This is the landing pad used for early Starship development flights.

Return to Launch Site – RTLS

A return to launch site usually means that after stage separation the booster flips and does a burn back towards the launch site, landing near where it initially launched from.

Agency

SpaceX

Type: Commercial
Abbreviation: SpX
Administration: CEO: Elon Musk
Founded: 2002
Launchers: Falcon | Starship
Spacecraft: Dragon
Country: USA

Space Exploration Technologies Corp., known as SpaceX, is an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company headquartered in Hawthorne, California. It was founded in 2002 by entrepreneur Elon Musk with the goal of reducing space transportation costs and enabling the colonization of Mars. SpaceX operates from many pads, on the East Coast of the US they operate from SLC-40 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station and historic LC-39A at Kennedy Space Center. They also operate from SLC-4E at Vandenberg Space Force Base, California, usually for polar launches. Another launch site is being developed at Boca Chica, Texas.

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Cathy Roling
Cathy Roling
1 year ago

Awesome. Thanks for the update! Please keep us updated to changes. So excited to go and watch this exciting event!

Aaron Gosnell
Aaron Gosnell
1 year ago

Hopefully it will be better than the last one. We want a successful flight from start to finish! No Partial failures.

Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
Reply to  Aaron Gosnell
1 year ago

Yep! No crashes for ME. Also why are they testing only the top 1/2 of SN9 instead of the entire ship?

Marco G.
Marco G.
Reply to  Aaron Gosnell
1 year ago

This will be AWESOME! Aaron, can I get some of your input on the Starship, and what do you like/not like about it.

Aaron Gosnell
Aaron Gosnell
Reply to  Marco G.
1 year ago

Don’t know much about SS Marco.So If you could give me the 411,That would be great!

Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
Reply to  Aaron Gosnell
1 year ago

Okay. What is 411?

Adave
Adave
1 year ago

If they want to catch the large rockets they should use existing technology of aircraft carriers. Just vertical for land and sea. Subs even launch from underwater. A Tesla valve might even create an air cushion for a stable catch in a well on land or ocean. Lots of wiggle… Read more »

Aaron Gosnell
Aaron Gosnell
1 year ago

In the words of Alan B Shepard:Fix your little problems and light this candle

Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
Reply to  Aaron Gosnell
1 year ago

Got anything from Neil Armstrong to say?

Aaron Gosnell
Aaron Gosnell
Reply to  Rocket Nerd
1 year ago

Well the reason I say that is because this is a launch site and as you know,Many times rockets are delayed.So that’s whyI sat that.

Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
1 year ago

Sounds great, can’t wait

Last edited 1 year ago by Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
1 year ago

Will it actually launch today, or will there keep being a scrub?

John McCoy
John McCoy
1 year ago

Love this page! So much easier to plan my time rather than constantly searching for updates!

Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
Reply to  John McCoy
1 year ago

Agreed. Love it!

Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
Reply to  John McCoy
1 year ago

I recommend this page to all

Rocket Nerd
Rocket Nerd
1 year ago

Lets hope that it launches today. I am tired of the scrubs. And enjoy the weather to all in Florida!

Larry David
Larry David
1 year ago

perhaps you could invest more than $5 in your camera as well as pay your camera person to keep it aimed at the rocket more than 2 seconds into the launch.

Rocket Monkey
Rocket Monkey
Admin
Reply to  Larry David
1 year ago

The video feeds are not provided by us. SpaceX provides the best camera work, it is the first video link.

Mike Scanlon
Mike Scanlon
1 year ago

I was disappointed that SN9 failed to land correctly. Similarly to SN8 it appeared to be coming in too fast to correct itself before landing. That having been said ,I am not a rocket scientist, and still have the utmost respect for what Elon and his team at SpaceX are… Read more »

Superphantom
Superphantom
1 year ago

Hmmmmmmm its pretty bad about the crash landing but hope Elon Musk got many data from the launch! keep good work, Space X!