Soyuz 10

Soyuz

Soviet Space Program

Launch Status
Success

Crew

Vladimir Shatalov

Vladimir Shatalov

Commander

Status: Retired
12/8/1927 -
Nationality: Soviet
Type: Government
Agency: Russian Federal Space Agency (ROSCOSMOS)

Vladimir Aleksandrovich Shatalov (Russian: Владимир Александрович Шаталов; born December 8, 1927) is a former Soviet cosmonaut who flew three space missions of the Soyuz programme: Soyuz 4, Soyuz 8, and Soyuz 10.

Shatalov was born in Petropavlovsk. From 1971 to 1987, he was Commander of Cosmonaut Training, and Director of the Cosmonaut Training Centre from then until 1991.

Quote: "When we look into the sky it seems to us to be endless. We breathe without thinking about it, as is natural... and then you sit aboard a spacecraft, you tear away from Earth, and within ten minutes you have been carried straight through the layer of air, and beyond there is nothing! The 'boundless' blue sky, the ocean which gives us breath and protects us from endless black and death, is but an infinitesimally thin film. How dangerous it is to threaten even the smallest part of this gossamer covering, this conserver of life."

Aleksei Yeliseyev

Aleksei Yeliseyev

Flight Engineer

Status: Retired
7/13/1934 -
Nationality: Soviet
Type: Government
Agency: Russian Federal Space Agency (ROSCOSMOS)

Aleksei Stanislavovich Yeliseyev (Russian: Алексей Станиславович Елисеев; born July 13, 1934) is a retired Soviet cosmonaut who flew on three missions in the Soyuz programme as a flight engineer: Soyuz 5, Soyuz 8, and Soyuz 10. Aleksei's father was Lithuanian with the last name Kuraitis, who died in the Soviet's Gulag as an enemy of the people. Aleksei uses his mother's last name "Yeliseyev" so some regard him as also being a Lithuanian cosmonaut.

Nikolay Rukavishnikov

Nikolay Rukavishnikov

Test Engineer

Status: Deceased
9/18/1932 - 10/19/2002
Nationality: Soviet
Type: Government
Agency: Russian Federal Space Agency (ROSCOSMOS)

Nikolay Nikolayevich Rukavishnikov was a Soviet cosmonaut who flew three space missions of the Soyuz programme: Soyuz 10, Soyuz 16, and Soyuz 33. Two of these missions, Soyuz 10 and Soyuz 33 were intended to dock with Salyut space stations, but failed to do so.

Mission

Soyuz 10

Type: Human Exploration

Soyuz 10 launched on 22 April 1971, 23:54:06 UTC. It carried commander Vladimir Shatalov, flight engineer Aleksei Yeliseyev and test engineer Nikolai Rukavishnikov into orbit. Flight was intended to become the world's first mission to the world's first space station, Salyut-1. Docking was not successful, and crew didn't enter the station. Crew returned to Earth, landing on 24 April 1971, 23:40 UTC.

Location

1/5

Baikonur Cosmodrome, Republic of Kazakhstan

465 launches have been at this location.

1/5, Baikonur Cosmodrome, Republic of Kazakhstan

Rocket

Soyuz

Length: meters
Diameter: meters
First Launched: January 18, 2021

The Soyuz rocket has been launched a total of 32 times with 30 successful and 2 failed launches.

Agency

Soviet Space Program

Type: Government
Abbreviation: CCCP
Administration:
Founded: 1931
Launchers:
Spacecraft:
Country: RUS

The Soviet space program, was the national space program of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) actived from 1930s until disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991.

The Soviet Union's space program was mainly based on the cosmonautic exploration of space and the development of the expandable launch vehicles, which had been split between many design bureaus competing against each other. Over its 60-years of history, the Russian program was responsible for a number of pioneering feats and accomplishments in the human space flight, including the first intercontinental ballistic missile (R-7), first satellite (Sputnik 1), first animal in Earth orbit (the dog Laika on Sputnik 2), first human in space and Earth orbit (cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin on Vostok 1), first woman in space and Earth orbit (cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova on Vostok 6), first spacewalk (cosmonaut Alexei Leonov on Voskhod 2), first Moon impact (Luna 2), first image of the far side of the Moon (Luna 3) and unmanned lunar soft landing (Luna 9), first space rover (Lunokhod 1), first sample of lunar soil automatically extracted and brought to Earth (Luna 16), and first space station (Salyut 1). Further notable records included the first interplanetary probes: Venera 1 and Mars 1 to fly by Venus and Mars, respectively, Venera 3 and Mars 2 to impact the respective planet surface, and Venera 7 and Mars 3 to make soft landings on these planets.

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