Soyuz | Soyuz 9

Soviet Space Program launch of a Soyuz Rocket

Soviet Space Program was scheduled to launch a Soyuz rocket as part of the Soyuz 9 mission. The launch window for the Human Exploration mission was on Mon, Jun 1st, 1970, 3:00 PM EDT from 31/6, Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. The status of the launch was Success. Don’t miss this exciting rocket launch!

Mission

Soyuz 9

Soyuz 9 carried cosmonauts Andrian Nikolayev & Vitali Sevastyanov to orbit. The mission lasted 17 days, 16 hours & 58 minutes completing 288 orbits around Earth. They broke the endurance record held by Gemini 7 for 5 years. This was the first crewed space launch that lifted off at night. As of 2016 it still holds the record for longest crewed flight by a solo spacecraft. The goal of the mission was to conduct various pysiological and biomedical experiments on themselves and invastigate possible social implications of extended duration spaceflight.

Location

Launch Pad Compass (Beta)

31/6, Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan

Baikonur Cosmodrome, Republic of Kazakhstan

Rocket

Soyuz

Russian Federal Space Agency (ROSCOSMOS)

The Roscosmos State Corporation for Space Activities, commonly known as Roscosmos, is the governmental body responsible for the space science program of the Russian Federation and general aerospace research. Soyuz has many launch locations the Russian sites are Baikonur, Plesetsk and Vostochny however Ariane also purchases the vehicle and launches it from French Guiana.

Crew

Vitaly Sevastyanov

Vitaly Sevastyanov

Flight Engineer - Russian

Vitaly Ivanovich Sevastyanov (Russian: Вита́лий Ива́нович Севастья́нов; 8 July 1935 – 5 April 2010) was a Soviet cosmonaut and an engineer who flew on the Soyuz 9 and Soyuz 18 missions.

Andriyan Nikolayev

Andriyan Nikolayev

Commander - Russian

Andriyan Grigoryevich Nikolayev was a Soviet cosmonaut. He was an ethnic Chuvash. Nikolayev flew on two space flights: Vostok 3 (effectively becoming the third Soviet cosmonaut) and Soyuz 9. His call sign in these flights was Falcon (Russian: Со́кол). On both, he set new endurance records for the longest time a human being had remained in orbit. He also served as backup for the Vostok 2 and Soyuz 8 missions.

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