Falcon 9 v1.0
Dragon Spacecraft Qualification Unit (DSQU)

Falcon 9 v1.0 | Dragon Spacecraft Qualification Unit (DSQU)

SpaceX launch of a Falcon 9 v1.0 Rocket

Watch Launch Video

SpaceX was scheduled to launch a Falcon 9 v1.0 rocket as part of the Dragon Spacecraft Qualification Unit (DSQU) mission. The launch window for the Test Flight mission was on Fri, Jun 4th, 2010, 2:45 PM EDT from Space Launch Complex 40, Cape Canaveral, FL. The status of the launch was Success. Don’t miss this exciting rocket launch! Watch the launch video of the Falcon 9 v1.0 and experience the excitement for yourself.

Mission

Dragon Spacecraft Qualification Unit (DSQU)

The Dragon Spacecraft Qualification Unit was a boilerplate version of the Dragon spacecraft. After using it for ground tests to rate Dragon's shape and mass in various tests, SpaceX launched it into low Earth orbit on the maiden flight of the Falcon 9 rocket. SpaceX used the launch to evaluate the aerodynamic conditions on the spacecraft and performance of the carrier rocket in a real-world launch scenario, ahead of Dragon flights for NASA under the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services program.

Location

Launch Pad Compass (Beta)

Space Launch Complex 40, Cape Canaveral, FL

Cape Canaveral, FL, USA
SpaceX

Rocket

Falcon 9 v1.0

The Falcon 9 v1.0 first stage was used on the first five Falcon 9 launches, and powered by nine SpaceX Merlin 1C rocket engines arranged in a 3x3 pattern.

SpaceX

Space Exploration Technologies Corp., known as SpaceX, is an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company headquartered in Hawthorne, California. It was founded in 2002 by entrepreneur Elon Musk with the goal of reducing space transportation costs and enabling the colonization of Mars. SpaceX has many pads, on the East Coast of the US they own SLC-40 at Cape Canaveral and LC-39A at the Kennedy Space Center for their lower inclination launches. They also own SLC-4E at Vandenberg, California for their high inclination launches. Another site is also being developed at Boca Chica, Texas.

Core expended on flight, no recovery effort. First flight of Falcon 9

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