Space Shuttle Columbia / OV-102
STS-65

Space Shuttle Columbia / OV-102 | STS-65

Lockheed Space Operations Company launch of a Space Shuttle Columbia OV-102 Rocket

Watch Launch Video

Lockheed Space Operations Company was scheduled to launch a Space Shuttle Columbia OV-102 rocket as part of the STS-65 mission. The launch window for the Microgravity Research mission was on Fri, Jul 8th, 1994, 12:43 PM EDT from Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, FL. The status of the launch was Success. Don’t miss this exciting rocket launch! Watch the launch video of the Space Shuttle Columbia OV-102 and experience the excitement for yourself.

Mission

STS-65

STS-65 was a Space Shuttle program mission of Columbia launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 8 July 1994. The flight was commanded by Robert D. Cabana who would go on later to lead the Kennedy Space Center.

Location

Launch Pad Compass (Beta)

Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, FL

Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA

Rocket

Space Shuttle Columbia OV-102

Space Shuttle Columbia was the first space-rated orbiter in NASA's Space Shuttle fleet. It launched for the first time on mission STS-1 on April 12, 1981, the first flight of the Space Shuttle program. Over 22 years of service it completed 27 missions before disintegrating during re-entry near the end of its 28th mission, STS-107 on February 1, 2003, resulting in the deaths of all seven crew members.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. NASA have many launch facilities but most are inactive. The most commonly used pad will be LC-39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Crew

Carl E. Walz

Carl E. Walz

Mission Specialist - American

Carl Erwin Walz is a former NASA astronaut currently working for Orbital Sciences Corporation's Advanced Programs Group as Vice President for Human Space Flight Operations. Walz was formerly assigned to the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC. He was the Acting Director for the Advanced Capabilities Division in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, and was responsible for a broad range of activities to include Human Research, Technology Development, Nuclear Power and Propulsion and the Lunar Robotic Exploration Programs to support the Vision for Space Exploration.

Richard Hieb

Richard Hieb

Mission Specialist - American

Richard James Hieb is a former NASA astronaut and a veteran of three space shuttle missions. He was a mission specialist on STS-39 and STS-49, and was a payload commander on STS-65.

Robert D. Cabana

Robert D. Cabana

Commander - American

Robert Donald Cabana is the director of NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center, a former NASA astronaut, and a veteran of four Space Shuttle flights. He is also a former naval flight officer and naval aviator in the United States Marine Corps.

James Halsell

James Halsell

Pilot - American

James Halsell was an Air Force Test Pilot when he was selected by NASA to become an Astronaut in 1990. He was a veteran of five flights totalling over 1,250 hours in space, pilot of two STS missions and commander of three. He also served as a manager for Shuttle Launch Integration and Space Shuttle Program manager. After the Columbia accident he led the NASA Return to Flight Planning team.

Leroy Chiao

Leroy Chiao

Mission Specialist - American

Leroy Chiao is a Chinese-American engineer, former NASA astronaut, entrepreneur, motivational speaker, and engineering consultant. Chiao flew on three Space Shuttle flights, and was the commander of Expedition 10, where he lived on board the International Space Station from October 13, 2004 to April 24, 2005. He is also a co-author and researcher for the Advanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in Microgravity project.

Donald A. Thomas

Donald A. Thomas

Mission Specialist - American

Donald Alan Thomas, Ph.D. is an American engineer and a former NASA astronaut.

Chiaki Mukai

Chiaki Mukai

Payload Specialist - Japanese

Chiaki Mukai (向井 千秋 Mukai Chiaki, born May 6, 1952, Tatebayashi, Gunma, Japan) is a Japanese doctor and JAXA astronaut. She was the first Japanese woman in space, and was the first Japanese citizen to have two spaceflights. Both were Space Shuttle missions; her first was STS-65 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia in July 1994, which was a Spacelab mission. Her second spaceflight was STS-95 aboard Space Shuttle Discovery in 1998. In total she has spent 23 days in space.

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