Falcon Heavy | STP-2

SpaceX launch of a Falcon Heavy Rocket

Watch Launch Video

SpaceX was scheduled to launch a Falcon Heavy rocket as part of the STP-2 mission. The launch window for the Dedicated Rideshare mission was on Mon, Jun 24th, 2019, 11:30 PM EDT from Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, FL. The status of the launch was Success with a 80% chance for favorable weather conditions. Don’t miss this exciting rocket launch! Watch the launch video of the Falcon Heavy and experience the excitement for yourself. The side boosters will attempt to land at LZ-1 and LZ-2.The side boosters will attempt to land at LZ-1 and LZ-2.The center core was not able to land successfully on OCISLY, this however was SpaceX's most ambitious landing attempt to date.

Mission

STP-2

The STP-2 payload is composed of 25 small spacecraft. Included is COSMIC-2 constellation to provide radio occultation data, along with 8 cubesat nanosatellites. Other payloads include LightSail carried by the Prox-1 nanosatellite, Oculus-ASR nanosatellite, GPIM and the Deep Space Atomic Clock.

Location

Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, FL

Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA

Rocket

Falcon Heavy

The Falcon Heavy is a variant of the Falcon 9 full thrust launch vehicle and will consist of a standard Falcon 9 rocket core, with two additional boosters derived from the Falcon 9 first stage.

SpaceX

Space Exploration Technologies Corp., known as SpaceX, is an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company headquartered in Hawthorne, California. It was founded in 2002 by entrepreneur Elon Musk with the goal of reducing space transportation costs and enabling the colonization of Mars. SpaceX has many pads, on the East Coast of the US they own SLC-40 at Cape Canaveral and LC-39A at the Kennedy Space Center for their lower inclination launches. They also own SLC-4E at Vandenberg, California for their high inclination launches. Another site is also being developed at Boca Chica, Texas.

The side boosters will attempt to land at LZ-1 and LZ-2.

Falcon Heavy side booster. First used on Arabsat-6A

Landing Zone 1 (LZ-1)

LZ-1 Pad located at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at the previous LC-13

Return to Landing Site (RTLS)

A return to landing site usually means that after stage separation the booster flips and does a burn back towards the launch site landing near where it initially launched from.

The side boosters will attempt to land at LZ-1 and LZ-2.

Falcon Heavy side booster. First used on Arabsat-6A

Landing Zone 2 (LZ-2)

LZ-2 Pad located at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at the previous LC-13. Directly next to LZ-1

Return to Landing Site (RTLS)

A return to landing site usually means that after stage separation the booster flips and does a burn back towards the launch site landing near where it initially launched from.

The center core was not able to land successfully on OCISLY, this however was SpaceX's most ambitious landing attempt to date.

Center core for the Falcon Heavy's 3rd mission, STP-2. Failed to land on ASDS OCISLY.

Of Course I Still Love You (OCISLY)

The second ASDS barge, Of Course I Still Love You (OCISLY) services launches in the Atlantic Ocean and was the site of the first landing of a SpaceX Falcon 9 first stage during CRS-8, the launch of a Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station.

Autonomous Spaceport Drone Ship (ASDS)

An autonomous spaceport drone ship (ASDS) is an ocean-going vessel derived from a deck barge, outfitted with station-keeping engines and a large landing platform. Construction of such ships was commissioned by aerospace company SpaceX to allow for recovery of rocket first-stages at sea for high-velocity missions which do not carry enough fuel to return to the launch site after lofting spacecraft onto an orbital trajectory.

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