Space Shuttle Challenger / OV-099
STS-41-G

Space Shuttle Challenger / OV-099 | STS-41-G

Lockheed Space Operations Company launch of a Space Shuttle Challenger OV-099 Rocket

Watch Launch Video

Lockheed Space Operations Company was scheduled to launch a Space Shuttle Challenger OV-099 rocket as part of the STS-41-G mission. The launch window for the Earth Science mission was on Fri, Oct 5th, 1984, 7:03 AM EDT from Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, FL. The status of the launch was Success. Don’t miss this exciting rocket launch! Watch the launch video of the Space Shuttle Challenger OV-099 and experience the excitement for yourself.

Mission

STS-41-G

STS-41-G was the thirteenth flight of the shuttle program and sixth of the Space Shuttle Challenger. It was the second landing made at the Kenendy Space Center. It was the first crew to carry two women, the first American EVA involving a woman, the first Australian Astronaut and first Canadian Astronaut.

Location

Launch Pad Compass (Beta)

Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, FL

Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA

Rocket

Space Shuttle Challenger OV-099

Space Shuttle Challenger was the second orbiter of NASA's space shuttle program to be put into service following Columbia. Its maiden flight, STS-6, started on April 4, 1983. It launched and landed nine times before breaking apart 73 seconds into its tenth mission, STS-51-L, on January 28, 1986, resulting in the death of all seven crew members, including a civilian school teacher. It was the first of two shuttles to be destroyed in flight, the other being Columbia in 2003.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. NASA have many launch facilities but most are inactive. The most commonly used pad will be LC-39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Crew

Robert Crippen
Robert Crippen
American Commander

Robert Laurel Crippen is an American retired naval officer and aviator, test pilot, aerospace engineer, and retired astronaut. He traveled into space four times: as Pilot of STS-1 in April 1981, the first Space Shuttle mission; and as Commander of STS-7 in June 1983, STS-41-C in April 1984, and STS-41-G in October 1984. Crippen received the Congressional Space Medal of Honor.

Jon McBride
Jon McBride
American Pilot

Jon Andrew McBride is a retired American naval officer and aviator, fighter pilot, test pilot, aeronautical engineer, and a former NASA astronaut.

Kathryn D. Sullivan
Kathryn D. Sullivan
American Mission Specialist

Kathryn Dwyer Sullivan is an American geologist and a former NASA astronaut. A crew member on three Space Shuttle missions, she was the first American woman to walk in space on October 11, 1984. She was Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration after being confirmed by the U.S. Senate on March 6, 2014. Sullivan's tenure ended on January 20, 2017 with the swearing in of President Donald Trump. Following completion of her service at NOAA, she was designated as the 2017 Charles A. Lindbergh Chair of Aerospace History at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum, and has also served as a Senior Fellow at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies.

David Leestma
David Leestma
American Mission Specialist

David Cornell Leestma is a former American astronaut and retired Captain in the United States Navy.

Paul Scully-Power
Paul Scully-Power
Australian-American Payload Specialist

Paul Desmond Scully-Power, AM, FRAeS (born May 28, 1944) is an Australian-American oceanographer, technology expert and business executive. In 1984, while a civilian employee of the United States Naval Undersea Warfare Center, he flew aboard NASA Space Shuttle mission STS-41-G as a Payload Specialist. He was the first Australian-born person to journey into space, and the first astronaut with a beard.

Marc Garneau
Marc Garneau
Canadian Payload Specialist

Garneau was one of the first Canadian Astronauts and he became the first Canadian in outer space in October 1984. In 1984, he was seconded to the new Canadian Astronaut Program (CAP), one of six chosen from over 4,000 applicants. He flew on the shuttle Challenger, STS-41-G from October 5 to 13, 1984, as payload specialist. He was promoted to Captain in 1986, and left the Navy in 1989, to become deputy director of the CAP. In 1992–93, he underwent further training to become a mission specialist. He worked as CAPCOM for a number of shuttle flights and was on two further flights himself: STS-77 (May 19 to 29, 1996) and STS-97 (to the ISS, November 30 to December 11, 2000). He has logged over 677 hours in space. In February 2001, he was appointed executive vice-president of the Canadian Space Agency, and became its president on November 22, 2001.

Sally Ride
Sally Ride
American Mission Specialist

Sally Kristen Ride was an American astronaut, physicist, and engineer. Born in Los Angeles, she joined NASA in 1978 and became the first American woman in space in 1983. Ride was the third woman in space overall, after USSR cosmonauts Valentina Tereshkova (1963) and Svetlana Savitskaya (1982). Ride remains the youngest American astronaut to have traveled to space, having done so at the age of 32. After flying twice on the Orbiter Challenger, she left NASA in 1987. She worked for two years at Stanford University's Center for International Security and Arms Control, then at the University of California, San Diego as a professor of physics, primarily researching nonlinear optics and Thomson scattering. She served on the committees that investigated the Challenger and Columbia space shuttle disasters, the only person to participate in both. Ride died of pancreatic cancer on July 23, 2012.

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