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Total Solar Eclipse Below the Bottom of the World

Total Solar Eclipse Below the Bottom of the World

Copyright: Petr Horálek
(ESO
Photo Ambassador,
Inst. of Physics in Opava) ;
Acknowledgement:
Xavier Jubier

In late 2021 there was a total solar eclipse visible only at the end of the Earth. To capture the unusual phenomenon, airplanes took flight below the clouded seascape of Southern Ocean. The featured image shows one relatively spectacular capture where the bright spot is the outer corona of the Sun and the eclipsing Moon is seen as the dark spot in the center. A wing and engine of the airplane are visible across the left and bottom of the image, while another airplane observing the eclipse is visible on the far left. The dark area of the sky surrounding the eclipsed Sun is called a shadow cone. It is dark because you are looking down a long corridor of air shadowed by the Moon. A careful inspection of the eclipsed Sun will reveal the planet Mercury just to the right. You won’t have to travel to the end of the Earth to see the next total solar eclipse. The total eclipse path will cross North America on 2024 April 8, just over one week from today. NASA Coverage: Total Solar Eclipse of 2024 April 8

Courtesy of NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day

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Don
Don
19 days ago

Good luck comrades.